NYLON TV celebrates the end of a great season with the threeASFOUR presentation, in collaboration with Yoko Ono. Then our host, Cory Kennedy snags an exclusive interview post-show with Yoko and Sean Lennon.

PAPER TV: Threeasfour's Collab Show With Yoko Ono

threeASFOUR’s colab show with Yoko Ono from PAPER Magazine on Vimeo.

Threeasfour‘s collab show with Yoko Ono at Milk last night was such a perfect ending to Fashion Week. In addition to providing the soundtrack to the show, sitting in the front row, and inspiring the dramatic presentation, Ono’s rarely-seen dot drawings were transformed onto fabric prints. A smart performance, lovely clothes and Yoko. Need we say more?

FASHION

RUNWAY RUNDOWN: THREEASFOUR S/S 2010

Kirby September 18 at 11:38 

RUNWAY RUNDOWN: Threeasfour S/S 2010  fashionA few weeks ago, Fashion Indie gave you a sneak-peek at the Threeasfour and Yoko Ono collaboration for the label’s Spring 2010 collection. That peek, however, did little to no justice for what the pieces actually looked like. Ono’s hand-drawn print silk dresses floated down the runway alongside several structural masterpieces, constructed in a 3-D sculptural manner. I can’t say that I was crazy about the models’ makeup, but the immaculate construction certainly picks up the slack!

GALLERY: RUNWAY RUNDOWN: Threeasfour S/S 2010

Thanks Style!


READ MORE ABOUT: 

thecut

ThreeASFOUR’s Collaboration With Yoko Ono a Truly Grand Finale to Fashion Week

ThreeASFOUR’s Collaboration With Yoko Ono a Truly Grand Finale to Fashion Week

Last night, threeASFOUR presented their spring 2010 collection — a collaboration with Yoko Ono based on her dot drawings — in Milk Studios, and it was one of the most unique shows of the season. Models came out carrying stools, placed them along the sides of the runway, and sat down. A girl in a white bathing suit with a white cover-up made of bits of fabric loosely sewn together took a place in the middle of the runway, holding a pair of scissors in each hand. One by one the models got up from their stools, walked slowly around the room, and then snipped away at the thread holding the center model’s cover-up together.
At the end, the garment slid off her shoulders and the models all exited in an elaborate configuration. It was a lovely, slightly creepy, and interesting way to end Fashion Week. However, our chatty and unexpected seat neighbor, Albert Maysles, was unimpressed. He explained that the show was inspired by the short film Cut Piece, which he directed in the sixties. In that film, Yoko sits on the stage in Carnegie Hall and invites the audience to come up and cut her clothes off. “That was more interesting, because men were doing the cutting,” Maysles said, “And you didn’t know how far they were going to go. There was more tension.” Maysles is not a regular guest at fashion shows. Though he found the show lacking, we kindly countered that this was the most interesting thing we had seen all week, the clothes were stunning, and the last thing we’re necessarily keen to see on the exhausting last day of Fashion Week is tension on the runway (unless it involves some sort of awesome front-row spat between, say, Lindsay Lohan and Taylor Momsen). Besides, there were moments we feared the models would accidentally cut their colleague. Though this show might have been even more intriguing done with male models dressed in drag, that wouldn’t have done justice to the lovely clothes.
Last night, threeASFOUR presented their spring 2010 collection — a collaboration with Yoko Ono based on her dot drawings — in Milk Studios, and it was one of the most unique shows of the season. Models came out carrying stools, placed them along the sides of the runway, and sat down. A girl in a white bathing suit with a white cover-up made of bits of fabric loosely sewn together took a place in the middle of the runway, holding a pair of scissors in each hand. One by one the models got up from their stools, walked slowly around the room, and then snipped away at the thread holding the center model’s cover-up together.
At the end, the garment slid off her shoulders and the models all exited in an elaborate configuration. It was a lovely, slightly creepy, and interesting way to end Fashion Week. However, our chatty and unexpected seat neighbor, Albert Maysles, was unimpressed. He explained that the show was inspired by the short film Cut Piece, which he directed in the sixties. In that film, Yoko sits on the stage in Carnegie Hall and invites the audience to come up and cut her clothes off. “That was more interesting, because men were doing the cutting,” Maysles said, “And you didn’t know how far they were going to go. There was more tension.” Maysles is not a regular guest at fashion shows. Though he found the show lacking, we kindly countered that this was the most interesting thing we had seen all week, the clothes were stunning, and the last thing we’re necessarily keen to see on the exhausting last day of Fashion Week is tension on the runway (unless it involves some sort of awesome front-row spat between, say, Lindsay Lohan and Taylor Momsen). Besides, there were moments we feared the models would accidentally cut their colleague. Though this show might have been even more intriguing done with male models dressed in drag, that wouldn’t have done justice to the lovely clothes.



Fashion Week in Review: Threeasfour ♥ Yoko Ono; Rodarte Dresses Us for the Apocalypse

By Angela Ashman,  The Village Voice

threeasfour2.jpg

Photos by Angela Ashman.

It was the kind of avant-garde spectacle that fashion outsiders would mock. Models, one by one, snipped away pieces of a spiral white dress worn by a model in the center of the room, until she was left wearing nothing but a bandeau top and high-waisted briefs. But performed for the Fashion Week crowd at the Threeasfour show on Thursday night, the production received a standing ovation — led by none other than Yoko Ono and Sean Lennon from the front row.

Of course, they were slightly biased. The models were performing Ono’s performance-art work Cut Piece, which she first staged in 1964 in Tokyo, inviting the audience to cut away all her clothes until she was naked…

The Threeasfour trio of Angela Donhauser, Adi Gil, and Gabriel Asfour named the legendary 76-year-old Ono their muse for spring, and it really was all about her. Besides the re-creation of her seminal work, the show also featured music from Ono’s forthcoming Plastic Ono Band album, which her son produced (think Ono’s signature “eeee-eeee-eeee” wailings over a tribal beat), and Ono’s dot drawings on flowing robes and dresses — our favorite pieces of the show. The collection predominantly consisted of all-black looks, including a few fantastic sculptural dresses over sliced leggings, but ended with a gorgeous white suit — perhaps a nod to John Lennon’s signature ’69 look. Overall, it was a show we won’t forget soon.

style.com



Threeasfour Is Loco For Yoko

by Maya SInger, Style.com, 17th Sept 2009

Yoko Ono requires no introduction. Artist, musical groundbreaker, all-around revolutionary…You know. Yoko Ono.

It’s a surprise, really, that a woman so iconic isn’t inspiring fashion collections each and every season. This season, at last, Ono will be front and center at Threeasfour, and in more ways than one. Adi Gil, Angela Donhauser, and Gabriel Asfour, the designers of Threeasfour, have taken Ono as their muse for Spring 2010, adapting some of her little-known dot drawings for prints in the new collection, cajoling her into soundtracking the show, and putting her in the front row.

The connection between Ono and Threeasfour isn’t incidental; her son Sean Lennon, also a person who doesn’t require much introduction, has been buddying around with the Threeasfour crew for years. “He filled me in on their work,” Ono says. “So I was excited to meet them, finally, at a concert a friend of mine was giving in my loft.” Lennon has actually contributed music to previous Threeasfour shows—a few seasons ago, he played live. But the music at the Spring ‘10 show is a family affair: The new Yoko Ono Plastic Ono Band album, Between My Head and the Sky, which Lennon produced, comes out September 21 on his own label, and Threeasfour showgoers get the preview.

The show is tonight at MAC & Milk; in the meantime, Ono and Lennon talk to Style.com about synchronicity, dots, and diaper-changing.

Sean, I vaguely recall that you wrote a new piece for that Threeasfour show you played at a few seasons ago…

Sean Lennon: The birdsong opera. That was a funny situation—they wanted something involving birds, and I’d just happened to have been working on something using this old scientific birdcall album.

That’s some synchronicity.

SL: We’re like family. There’s a very strong kind of internal connection. But this show, this story’s not about me. It’s really about the connection between my mom’s art, her drawings, and Threeasfour’s sense of form. I mean, it’s kind of eerie—this series of abstract pointillist drawings is just crazily similar to the way they do their cuts. It seemed like it would be cool to use the music to extrapolate the connections between their aesthetics. Especially since we have the album coming out next week.

Yoko, do you feel that sense of connection to Threeasfour that Sean is talking about?

Yoko Ono: Yes, my art and their art, it’s very similar. Very elitist, in a way. Very interested in making the good work, but the good work, sometimes people love it but it’s not very commercial. I think it’s interesting that they are doing something commercial now.

You mean, the fact that Threeasfour are introducing a new pricing scheme—$111 to $888?

YO: Yes. It’s great to do that.
SL: It’s really fascinating to me, the way Threeasfour maintain this avant-garde, experimental integrity, and yet also maintain a presence in the industry. I really admire that about them—the fact that they want their experiments to be relevant. This new concept is part of that.

YO: I would wear their clothes.

Yoko, are you inspired by fashion? I mean, does it interest you as an artist?

YO: I always thought that fashion is a very important part of art, sculptural art. You see that in my book called Grapefruit, a book of instructions. Art instructions and fashion design instructions, as well.

Did you work with Threeasfour at all on the development of your dot drawings into prints?

YO: No, they just took the work. I was happy that they thought of it.

Tell me about the new album. Was this your first time working together, music-wise?

YO: No, when Sean was 17 I made a CD called Rising, and Sean and Sean’s friends all played on it.

SL: And we’ve recorded some other things over the years and played together at festivals. But this was the first time she’s let me take a production role.

Is it weird, being produced by your son?

YO: I knew he was a good musician, but to be a producer and a music director, that’s a different story. It was a pleasant surprise to find out that my son is so good at those things, too.

Sean, is it weird producing your mom?

SL: I’m not going to say it isn’t strange, at times, to be giving direction to a woman who used to change your diapers. But, I mean, I’ve been listening to her music my whole life, and I really appreciate what she does—it’s like she’s making experimental jazz records, only instead of a horn solo, there’s her voice. Very free-form and funky and emotive. I don’t know, it’s hard to qualify her music in terms of other genres, in fact.

YO: I think it all depends on the person listening to the music. They get from it what they need.

SL: Ultimately, I feel like I understand what she wants. So it was easy to facilitate. I mean, I’m her son, but aside from that, I’m just a big Yoko fan.

thecut

ThreeASFOUR’s Spring 2010 Collaboration With Yoko Ono

by Amy Odell, New York Magazine.

Design trio ThreeASFOUR collaborated with Yoko Ono on their spring 2010 collection, which they’ll show September 17 at Milk Studios. The clothes are inspired by Ono’s rarely seen dot drawings, which the designers turned into limited-edition prints on cotton and silk for the new collection. Pieces come in shades of black, white, and ice blue, and twist around the body with curved seaming. Best of all, the collection will range from $111 to $888. Designers Adi, Ange, and Gabi describe Ono as their “ideal customer” and “ideal woman.” The evening will also include a preview of Ono’s new album, “Between My Head and the Sky,” which comes out on September 21. See an exclusive first look at the forthcoming collection in the slideshow. We are drooling over it. (Photos by Susan Pittard).

Vogue.com - latest fashion first

Ono On Board

by Jessica Bumpus, Vogue.com

YOKO ONO has indeed lent her creative touch to design trio Threeasfour – following fashion whispers last month that something might be in the pipeline.The label has teamed up with the artist and late partner of John Lennon to create a collection, entitled Iconoclastic. Not only is the collection inspired by Ono but it also incorporates some of her rarely seen illustrations, which have been translated into prints for the pieces.

“I was always interested in expressing art through clothes. I think there is an incredible connection. It’s almost like sculpture, but you can wear them,” explains Ono, who met the Threeasfour design trio Gabi, Adi and Ange at a concert she gave in her loft. “They seemed to be extremely interesting designers.”

The designers add: “Yoko was always and is our hero and muse. We admire her work and music, and once we went to her studio and saw all these beautiful black and white drawings, we thought we should do something together.”

The collection will also see a more democratic approach to price points. Of her foray into fashion, Ono tells WWD: “I think it is much nicer when you are making a slight difference by somebody else touching your art and participating and adding creativity.”

57692e65c845d26c6318a554e5136862

93447cafa0f0cec0cab30985e70579a3

\72af770ff9b08dd9ed0a49c440248a13

65bb7d33c36a850536da6ed654caaa99

Yoko Ono for THREEASFOUR Poster Set – $45.00

Design trio ThreeASFOUR collaborated with Yoko Ono on their spring 2010 collection which debuts September 17, 2009. The clothes are inspired by Ono’s rarely seen dot drawings, which the designers turned into limited-edition prints on cotton and silk for the new collection. This set of three individually numbered posters were executed for this occasion. Each poster is 20 x 28 inches.

50 Poster sets will be made available for purchase exclusively through our bookstore. Each set consists of 3 individual designs. Posters will be on display September 17, 2009 at Milk Studios for the debut of the collection during New York City Fashion Week.

Each unsigned poster pack is numbered x/50 and will be shipped flat.

Available at ohwow.com

MyItThings.com

Threeasfour Collaborates with Yoko Ono for Spring 2010 Collection

by Donna Ho, My It Things

Threeasfour is really becoming “three as four.” The design trio Gabi, Adi, and Ange have been working as a team for several years and have now added Yoko Ono as a partner for its Spring 2010 collection.

It’s a perfect match for the trio who uses the artist and musician as a muse for its “Iconoclastic” collection. Threeasfour collaborated with Ono by translating her dot drawings into prints for pieces.

“I was always interested in expressing art through clothes,” Ono said. “I think there is an incredible connection. It’s almost like sculpture, but you can wear them.”

The line inspired by the sky and Mother Nature will feature shades of black, white, and ice blue. The collaboration will retail from $111 to $888.

stylelist

ThreeAsFour Collaborates with Yoko Ono to Design More Affordable Line

by Bee-Shyuan Chang, Style List

ThreeAsFour’s lower line, “Iconoclastic,” will have a rock ‘n’ roll edge, so the designers went straight to the source – Yoko Ono.

The new design foursome banded together to work on the label’s spring 2010 collection. And as an artsy bonus, the collection will feature some of artist-musician Ono’s rarely seen dot-drawings, says the source.

“I was always interested in expressing art through clothes. I think there is an incredible connection. It’s almost like sculpture, but you can wear them”.

In an expected (and welcome) twist, the pricey line is making Ono’s edgy leanings more accessible by lowering price points. Usually, ThreeAsFour pieces retail for around $1,000, but this collaboration will have price points ranging from $111 to $888, reports the site.

Inspired by the colors of the sky — shades of black, white and ice blue — the collaboration will debut at New York Fashion Week, where Ono and son Sean Lennon will provide the music for the presentation.

As to how the collaboration came about, the designers met Ono at a private concert she gave in her loft. Adi tells WWD, “Yoko was always and is our hero and muse.”

ELLE UK Logo

Yoko Ono Collaborates with ThreeAsFour

By Laurelle Gilbert, Elle

Yoko Ono prints to be transformed by label Threeasfour.

The label has finally revealed their plans as NY fashion week kicks off this week. The trio’s spring /summer 2010 ‘Iconoclastic’ collection is not only an homage to the artist, musician and performer but the team have taken some of Ono’s rarely seen dot drawings and transformed them in to fabric prints for their new collection.

The collaboration came about when Ono met Gabi, Adi and Ange of Threeasfour at a concert she was giving in her New York loft. ‘They seemed to be extremely interesting designers’ said Ono, while Threeasfour described the meeting as, ‘love at first sight!’

The collection features black white and sky-blue to evoke Mother Nature (something that inspires Ono and Threeasfour) and for the first time will be priced lower, a concious decision made by the label this season.

Women’s Wear Daily

wwd

Facebook Comments

comments

Tagged with:  

One Response to YokoOnoThreeAsFour Spring 2010 Collection

  1. Yoko is breathing harmony in this beloved planet.
    Besides she is very chick.

Leave a Reply

TWITTER

INSTAGRAM

Instagram


IMAGINE PEACE © 2014 Yoko Ono

Empowered by REVL8

.

FACEBOOK



%d bloggers like this: