Yoko Ono, IMAGINE PEACE at the John Erickson Museum of Art, 2008-9. Photo by Sean Miller.

JEMA travels IMAGINE PIECE to the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, in Gainesville, Florida

JEMA proudly announces Yoko Ono’s IMAGINE PEACE is reopened at JEMA and is currently on view at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, in Gainesville, Florida [map]. Yoko Ono’s exhibition runs from From October 6 – January 3rd, 2009-10, and includes her text-based work IMAGINE PEACE (2007) as well as WISH PIECE (1996). Viewers are invited to attend JEMA’s new outdoor sculpture garden and contribute to one of Yoko Ono’s Wish Trees by writing wishes on provided pieces of paper and adding them to the branches of the tree. Viewers and participants will note the tree provided for the exhibition is somewhat diminutive in keeping with the scale of JEMA’s gallery spaces. JEMA consultants from the JEMA Annex were present to distribute pencils and paper for Wish Peace during the October 6th opening at the Harn Museum of Art. JEMA Annex Consultants included Charisse Calaquian, Leah Floyd, Ladis Pietros, Kelly Rogers, and Matthew Whitehead. In time, all wishes will be gathered by the Annex Consultants and sent to The IMAGINE PEACE TOWER on Videy Island, Reykjavik, Iceland.

Previously IMAGINE PIECE opened at JEMA in Belfast, Northern Ireland in April, 2008. The exhibition traveled from Golden Thread Gallery, Catalyst Arts, NVTV Studios, and briefly left Belfast to open in Glasgow at the Glasgow School of the Arts.

Yoko Ono writes:

Power works in mysterious ways.
You don’t have to do much.
Visualize the domino effect and just start thinking peace.
The message will circulate faster than you think.
It’s time for action.
And the action is peace.
Spread the word.
Spread peace.
I love you!

-Yoko Ono, Excerpt from Statement for Imagine Peace Exhibition at JEMA, Spring
2008.

See a little art at JEMA… More or less,
John Erickson Museum of Art
A Location Variable Museum

Yoko Ono's exhibition at JEMA includes her text-based work IMAGINE PEACE (2007) as well as WISH PIECE (1996).

JEMA Annex Consultants arriving at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art to assist with IMAGINE PEACE. Annex Consultants included Charisse Calaquian, Leah Floyd, Ladis Pietros, Kelly Rogers, and Matthew Whitehead. Photo by Jayanti Seiler.

Yoko Ono’s IMAGINE PEACE opened at JEMA and installed at the Harn Museum (left image). JEMA Annex Consultants meeting and preparing for a day’s work at the Harn Museum. JEMA security, Dan Stepp stands in foreground. Photos by Jayanti Seiler and Sean Miller.

JEMA Annex Consultants wrote the first wishes on the Wish Tree and began gathering and distributing paper and pencils to viewers at Harn. Photo by James Nguyen.

JEMA Annex Consultant, Charisse Calaquian assist an IMAGINE PEACE participant. Photo by Jayanti Seiler.

Another wish for Wish Piece. Photo by Jayanti Seiler.

Yoko Ono, Wish Piece at the John Erickson Museum of Art, 2008-9. Kelly Rogers and Leah Floyd (of the JEMA Annex) pass out tags for Yoko Ono’s Wish Tree at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art. Photo by Sean Miller.

Wish Piece at the Harn Museum opening on Oct. 6, 2009. Photo Sean Miller.

Wish Piece at the Harn Museum opening on Oct. 6, 2009. Photo Sean Miller.

Sean Miller, Paint on Canvas #6: Tickets to the John Erickson Museum of Art, Oil and Acrylic Paint on Canvas, 2009.

Yoko Ono’s IMAGINE PEACE exhibition at JEMA includes her text-based work IMAGINE PEACE (2007) as well as WISH PIECE (1996).

Viewers are invited to attend JEMA’s new outdoor sculpture garden and contribute to two of Ono’s Wish Trees by writing wishes on provided pieces of paper and adding them to the branches of the trees. In time, all wishes will be gathered and sent to The IMAGINE PEACE TOWER on Videy Island, Reykjavik, Iceland.

In a 2007 interview with Forrest Reda from Jambase:

Q: What is the state of the peace movement now? How does it compare to the 1960s and 1970s?

Yoko Ono: In those days we were waving flags, so it was clear that something was going on. But now, I think people are doing it in a different way. They are not waving flags, but they really visualizing peace, and I think it’s going to work out. People are saying, ‘Isn’t there more to do than just IMAGINING PEACE?’ But look what’s happening now. Think about it, even on a logical level, when you are IMAGINING PEACE, you can’t be angry or you can’t be violent. I think [the idea] ‘IMAGINE PEACE’ is pretty strong…you can’t be sad or resentful or attacking somebody when you are just IMAGINING PEACE.

Q: Describe the differences she sees in personal liberties in the United States in the 2000′s with George Bush, compared to the 1970s under Richard Nixon.
Yoko Ono: Anyone can try [to take our personal liberties away] but it’s not going to happen because thoughts are really inside us, and they can’t control our thoughts.

IMAGINE PEACE

You may think, well, how are we going to get one billion people to think
peace?
Imagine Peace.
Because if one billion people in the world think peace, we will get peace.
Remember each one of us has the power to change the world.
Power works in mysterious ways.
You don’t have to do much.
Visualize the domino effect and just start thinking peace.
The message will circulate faster than you think.
It’s time for action.
And the action is peace.
Spread the word.
Spread peace.
I love you!

Yoko Ono,
Excerpt from Statement for IMAGINE PEACE Exhibition at Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville, FL, USA
Fall 2009.

WISH PIECE

Make a wish.
Write it down on a piece of paper.
Fold it and tie it around a branch of a wish tree.
Ask your friends to do the same.
Keep wishing
Until the branches are covered with wishes.

Yoko Ono, 1996

Yoko Ono, Egg Interview

Yoko Ono: ‘I would say all my works are a form of prayer or a wish. And so this is really a wish piece. And people write down their wishes, and then they sort of tie the knot on the tree. There are lines of people who want to do that. So, whenever we have the “Wish Tree” piece, we have to supply maybe three or four or sometimes twenty trees instead of the first one because the one becomes so heavy with [paper] … it’s an incredible amount of … wishing. I enjoy that piece very much, and I have wishes from people from many different countries now and I’m keeping it all. I am not going to look [at them], I mean it’s sacrilegious to look [at them]. Their wish should go from here to there directly, not being interfered or intruded on by me. So, I am collecting all these wishes, and then one day I am going to make a piece that contains all the wishes and it will be very powerful, I think.’

About IMAGINE PEACE TOWER

The IMAGINE PEACE TOWER is a work of art conceived by Yoko Ono in memory of John Lennon.
It is dedicated to peace and bears the inscription ‘IMAGINE PEACE’ in 24 languages.
Its construction and installation is a collaboration between Yoko Ono, the City of Reykjavik, Reykjavik Art Museum and Reykjavik Energy.
The work is in the form of a wishing well from which a very strong and tall tower of light emerges. The strength, intensity and brilliance of the light tower continually changes as the particles in the air fluctuate with the prevailing weather and atmospheric conditions unique to Iceland.
Every year it will light up between October 9th (Lennon’s birthday) and December 8th (the day of his death).
In addition the IMAGINE PEACE TOWER will be lit on New Year’s Eve, during the first week of spring and on some rare special occasions agreed between the City and Ono.

Welcome to JEMA

Advancements in technology and new ideas in contemporary art are preparing the current visual art audience to witness radically new and diverse exhibition strategies. Ideas associated with Marcel Duchamp’s Boite-en-valise (1941), and Brian O’Doherty’s Inside the White Cube (1976), have (for decades) provided groundbreaking precedents from which to conceive and approach the display of art. Advancements in internet technology, digital imaging and critical insights related to site-specificity have further expanded possible innovations in art display tactics. As a result, today’s exhibition spaces may be planned, constructed, maintained, and enjoyed with unprecedented levels of affordability, efficiency, and creativity.

The John Erickson Museum of Art (JEMA) is an example of one possible method of developing an exciting new venue for artists and viewers. It also functions as a model for discussing innovative possibilities toward the development of vital yet affordable art centers. JEMA’s portable quality offers artists an exhibition space that encourages radical experimentation with a low financial overhead. This new museum space is founded on an unwavering belief concerning the quick, decisive and efficient delivering art to the viewing public. This type of activity is an important sign of a vital cultural institution. Many art museums require years to schedule exhibitions. Moving slowly – these institutions function with power and strength but remain bogged down by red tape and expensive exhibitions.
By moving with stealth and agility, JEMA carries out its functions in a portable and thrifty manner. JEMA’s design allows for a greater focus on exhibition planning and a stronger intercommunication between the institution, exhibiting artists, and you (the viewing public). JEMA brings the art to you!

Think JEMA… more or less.

YOKO ONO

Yoko Ono is a major contributor to the field of international Conceptual Art. Her early work as part of the international avant-garde and her affiliation with the Fluxus group is filled with diverse groundbreaking work in the areas experimental film, sound art, site-specific works, and performance. Her collaborative activist projects with John Lennon and her keen ability to send political messages through mass media outlets preceded and anticipated the work of many contemporary interventionist artists. In 2000-2001 Yoko Ono’s exhibition, Yes, won the International Association of Art Critics/USA Award for Best Museum Show Originating in New York City.

Yoko Ono: IMAGINE PEACE at JEMA

Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
SW 34th Street and Hull Road Gainesville, Florida 32611-2700, USA

PHONE
Museum: 352.392.9826
Camellia Court Café: 352.392.2735

LOCATION
The Harn Museum is located on the University of Florida campus at the UF Cultural Plaza.

Physical Address:
Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
SW 34th Street and Hull Road
Gainesville, Florida 32611-2700

Mailing Address:
Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
PO Box 112700
Gainesville, Florida 32611-2700

DRIVING DIRECTIONS
From I-75:
Take Exit Number 384 (State Road 24/Archer Road).
Travel east on Archer Road for approximately 2 miles.
Turn left onto SW 34th Street and travel approximately 1 mile.
Turn right onto Hull Road.
Turn right into the second drive on the right to enter the Cultural Plaza.
Parking is located in front of the museum for a fee of $3.

From the Gainesville Regional Airport:
Exit the airport drive and turn right on SR 222 (39th Avenue).
Travel for approximately 4 miles.
Turn left onto US 441 (13th Street).
Turn right on SR 20 (University Avenue) and travel approximately 3 miles.
Turn left onto 34th Street and travel approximately 1 mile.
Turn left onto Hull Road.
Turn right into the second drive on the right to enter the Cultural Plaza.
Parking is located in front of the museum for a fee of $3.

PARKING

Parking is available in the lot directly in front of the museum for a rate of $3 per day. The amount is payable at the parking kiosk located in the lot. Parking is free on Saturdays, Sundays and during Museum Nights. Free handicap parking is available near the front entrance of the museum. For individuals with a valid University of Florida parking decal, “all decal” parking is available in the lot and parking garage in front of the Cultural Plaza.

HOME
FREE ADMISSION
OPEN Tues – Fri, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. | Sat, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. | Sun, 1 – 5 p.m.
VISIT SW 34th Street and Hull Road • Gainesville, Florida 32611-2700 MAP IT
PHONE 352.392.9826

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