///Group Show: Love Cures [Miami, Florida]

Group Show: Love Cures [Miami, Florida]

Love Cures
MIAMI BEACH, FL.- ArtCenter/South Florida (“ACSF”) proudly partners with
curator and artist Carolina Salazar to present Love Cures, a contemporary
charity art auction exhibition benefiting the advancement of neuroblastoma
research.

Fifty emerging and established artists including Yoko Ono, William Wegman,
Elizabeth Peyton, Carlos Betancourt, Pablo Cano and Michele OkaDoner were
invited to interpret love into a unique work of art for this heart-warming exhibition.

The opening reception on January 9, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. will kick-off a
three-week show of auction pieces at:
Art Center South Florida
800 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, FL 33139 [map]
Tel: 305.674.8278
Fax: 305.674.8772
Website: www.artcentersf.org

On view until February 1, 2009, bidding night will follow on February 5, 2009 at
Miami Art Space in Wynwood.

On September 10, 2007, Salazar was informed by doctors at the Miami
Children’s Hospital that her baby had a rare and potentially fatal form
of cancer called neuroblastoma. Undergoing bone marrow biopsies,
surgery, chemotherapy, CT-scans, X-rays and numerous MRI’s before his
first birthday, Salazar chose to fight as passionately for a cure as her
son was fighting for survival.

“Working in the arts administrative field and practicing art for most of
my life, an art auction was the clear vehicle of choice to help bring
awareness to this deadly disease,” said Salazar. “I believe that art has
the power to heal, to inspire and to even transform a person’s life.
Thanks to the arts community and to generous supporters, Love Cures
comprises an inspirational selection of works created in a variety of
mediums and perspectives.”

One-hundred percent of the proceeds from the Love Cures auction will be
donated to The Band of Parents Foundation, a non-profit organization
dedicated to neuroblastoma research at one of the world’s leading
institutions, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Neuroblastoma is a
childhood cancer of the sympathetic nervous system, with diagnoses
occurring on average at approximately 17 months of age. Children
diagnosed before the age of 18 months have a high survival rate, but
high-risk children diagnosed before age five only have about a 30
percent chance to live. The cause of neuroblastoma is unknown, though it
is believed to be an accidental cell growth that occurs during normal
development of the adrenal glands. Increased awareness and research is
needed to find a cure for the 650 children diagnosed every year.

Participating artists: Ray Azcuy, George Bethea, Carlos Betancourt,
Pablo Cano, Rosemarie Chiarlone, Elisabeth Condon, Adalberto Delgado,
Carlos DeVillasante, Franklin Einspruch, Priscilla Ferguson, Daniel
Fiorda, Andy Gambrell, Rebecca Guarda, Amanda Keeley, Iran Issa Khan,
Joshua Levine, Stephanie Lee-Jones, Peter Lik, Emilio Martinez, Beatriz
Monteavero, Mile Murtanovski, Michele OkaDoner, Yoko Ono, Elizabeth
Peyton, Josephina Posch, Lucio Pozzi, Darren Price, Ralph Provisero,
Brian Reedy, Carolina Salazar, Yolanda Sanchez, Carolina Sardi, Claudia
Scalise, Diego Singh, Odalis Valdivieso, William Wegman, Michelle
Weinberg, Annie Wharton, Richard White and Laena Wilder.

 

From Carolina Salazar

Everyone has a defining moment in life. For myself that defining moment
was on September 10, 2007 sitting in a hospital room with my nine month
old as I listened to the doctor inform me that my baby had a rare and
potentially deadly form of cancer called neuroblastoma. It is the words
no parent would ever want to hear. Today we continue our hopeful battle
with this disease and my son is continuing treatment at Memorial Sloan
Kettering Cancer Center (M.S.K.C.C.) in New York City where they
specialize in neuroblastoma research. He has undergone bone marrow
biopsies, surgery, chemotherapy, CT-Scans, x-rays and numerous MRI’s
before his first birthday. It is now my goal as a parent to help bring
awareness and find a cure for him and other children who are battling
this disease.

Working in the arts administrative field and practicing art for most of
my life, an art auction seemed like an obvious choice to use as a
vehicle to help bring awareness to this deadly disease. I believe art
has the power to heal, to inspire and to even transform a person’s life.
With this being said, I would like to take the opportunity to invite you
to participate in the Love Cures Contemporary Art Auction.

Love Cures will take place on or around February 14, 2009. A reception
at a Miami gallery/venue with an estimated 350 invitees will be in
attendance. The month of February is a significant date because three
children lost their battle to neuroblastoma at MSKCC in February of
2008. The auction is in honor of them and other children who are
currently fighting for their lives. One-hundred percent of the auction
proceeds will be donated to Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in
New York City, a leader in cancer research for the advancement of
neuroblastoma research.

Our goal is to receive 50 pieces of art to be auctioned off by emerging
and established artists. The theme behind the auction is love so we ask
you to give us your interpretation of love in your work. Although there
is no size restriction, we ask you to keep in mind very large works may
be difficult to auction off so a small to medium size is suggested. If
you would like to participate in the Love Cures art auction please
respond by April 1st 2008 to [email protected] or 786.395.6307
confirming your participation.

Enclosed you will find more information regarding neuroblastoma funding
and research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Band of
Parents, a non-profit organization made up of parents with children who
have neuroblastoma. In recent years there have been great strides in
conquering childhood cancers but we need to continue to advance until
there is a cure for all children afflicted with these malignancies. Your
support will bring us closer to this goal. I look forward to your
participation in this worthy cause.

Sincerely,

Carolina Salazar

 

The Facts on Neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer of the sympathetic nervous system,
affecting approximately 650 children in the U.S. every year. It is the
second most common solid tumor in infants. Most children are diagnosed
by 2.5 years of age. Up to sixty percent of them have high risk disease
that has metastasized by the time they are diagnosed. Survival is
dependent on age and disease stage: children diagnosed before the age of
18 months have a high survival rate, but high risk children diagnosed
before age 5 have about a 30 percent chance of survival. For children
over age 5 the prognosis is often fatal. The cause of neuroblastoma is
unknown, though most physicians believe that it is an accidental cell
growth that occurs during normal development of the adrenal glands.
Increased awareness and improved screening has contributed to a recent
increase in the detection and incidence of neuroblastoma. In the 1980s,
fewer than 5% of children diagnosed with high risk neuroblastoma
survived.

Funding Neuroblastoma Research

Funding for cancer research is limited in general. The vast majority of
federal funding and private donations for cancer research are directed
toward adult cancers. Fortunately pediatric cancers are uncommon.
Unfortunately cancer funding tends to be distributed based on the number
of people who have the cancer rather than the years of potential life
lost. For this reason, prostate cancer which does not substantially
shorten the lives of the majority of patients who have it receives far
more funding than all childhood cancers combined. Similarly, the
pharmaceutical industry is generally not interested in pediatric cancers
because of the small market size unless the treatment also happens to be
effective in adult cancers.

 

Research at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
In 1987, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center team began treating
children with 3F8, a monoclonal antibody developed by Dr. Nai-Kong
Cheung. 3F8 can attach to neuroblastoma cells and kill them, and can
also train the child’s own immune system to attack and kill
neuroblastoma. In the last 2 decades, 3F8 treatment notably improved
survival, without lasting side effects. Today, 80 percent of children
with high risk neuroblastoma treated at MSKCC from diagnosis achieve
remission. More than 50% of these patients are expected to remain in
remission after consolidation with 3F8/GMCSF immunotherapy. Because 3F8
is made from mouse antibodies, many children develop immunity to it,
making further 3F8 treatment ineffective. For those who form immunity
too soon, the problem is huge—their disease is likely to return or
progress. Thus, one of the most exciting projects is the development of
a “humanized” 3F8 antibody (HU3F8) that would avoid this setback. The
specialists in neuroblastoma at MSKCC believe developing HU3F8 is a
priority because it could save even more children. In addition MSKCC is
developing other very promising innovative treatments, such as vaccines
intended to strengthen a child’s immune system against neuroblastoma,
ways to improve the tumor-killing activity of 3F8, antibodies that bring
liquid radiation directly to tumor cells and a new antibody, 8H9, which
has been successful in killing neuroblastoma that has recurred in the
central nervous system — a type of relapse that was 100 percent fatal
just 5 years ago. MSKCC has made great strides in recent years but they
still need to continue to advance until they have successfully
controlled and cured all children afflicted with these malignancies.

 

Band of Parents


The Band of Parents are parents of children diagnosed with neuroblastoma
who want to help further the research and drug development desperately
needed to save more children. The families in the Band of Parents come
from across the country and around the world. Cancer plays no
favorites—as they are families of all races, religions, occupations, and
political views, bound together by a single fact: each of them has a
child diagnosed with neuroblastoma. Although some are in remission, many
of these children are fighting for their lives right now. As parents,
they have banded together to increase public awareness about
neuroblastoma and to raise funds for the development of novel therapies.
They are working in partnership with the talented and dedicated team of
doctors at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) who are
fighting to save these children from this deadly disease. MSKCC has
recently established the Band of Parents’ Neuroblastoma Initiatives Fund
which allows for 100% of charitable donations made on behalf of B.O.P.
to go directly to fund neuroblastoma research at MSKCC.

For more information on how to support neuroblastoma research at
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center please visit bandofparents.org.
Your partnership and support will help them achieve their goal.

 

Band of Parents, Inc. a/k/a Band of Parents is a not-for-profit 
corporation duly incorporated under the laws of the State of New York. 
Band of Parents is a 501(c)3 public charity. Your donations are 
tax-deductible to the full extent of the law

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2009-01-03T22:28:39+00:00 January 2nd, 2009|Events & Exhibitions News|