HIROSHIMA, Japan - Artist Yoko Ono (R) and Hiroshima Mayor Kazumi Matsui hold up a folded paper crane in each hand at a peace event in the city of Hiroshima, western Japan, on July 30, 2014. The 81-year-old artist asked participants to spread to the world the experience of Hiroshima, which was devastated by a U.S.-dropped atomic bomb in 1945 in World War II. (Kyodo)

HIROSHIMA, Japan – Artist Yoko Ono (R) and Hiroshima Mayor Kazumi Matsui hold up a folded paper crane in each hand at a peace event in the city of Hiroshima, western Japan, on July 30, 2014. The 81-year-old artist asked participants to spread to the world the experience of Hiroshima, which was devastated by a U.S.-dropped atomic bomb in 1945 in World War II. (Kyodo)

Dear Family of Peace

This time (on my latest visit to Japan) I went specially to Hiroshima to fold a paper crane with one victim of the 1945 Atomic Bomb, and the youth of now beautiful Hiroshima City to dedicate it to the ones who died from the bombing.

Orizuru -the paper crane – is the symbol of peace, and I know that many of you in the world know how to fold it.

Do it on August 6th in dedication to the Victims of the Bomb, repeating to yourself and to the world NO MORE HIROSHIMA as you do it. Then the folding of the paper crane, you will realize will become a meditation you share with the world.

You can bury the orizuru you made in your back yard, hang it in your room, keep it inside a book you love to read, or send it to a friend.

Fold more than one orizuru and send them to all your friends, explaining the occasion, if you wish.


The statement below was made by me at the Hiroshima Memorial on 2011. I have read it over now, and realized that it still works as a statement from me today. So I am sending it to you again by changing the dates. I love you!

Yoko Ono pays tribute and lays flowers at the Hiroshima Memorial, August 2011.

 

Dear Friends,

The 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were a tragedy of the greatest magnitude.

Even now, 69 years later, many victims of the violence of atomic weapons are still suffering, physically, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

People make a point of it. They don’t want us to forget. Of course, we are not forgetting.

But when you actually visit Hiroshima as I did in 2011, you will be totally surprised by what you see and experience. Hiroshima now is a beautiful shining city with healthy people and great food!

How did they do it?

“All that we are is the result of what we thought.” – Buddha

Yes. It’s the thoughts of the Hiroshima people who brought this incredible recovery.

The 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami hit us hard. And for us and for our planet it is important that we make the fastest recovery from it.

Let’s start with having good thoughts – especially about ourselves.
Don’t waste time being angry at greed-ridden corporate guys and lying-through-the teeth politicians.

We have to focus on what we can do, and do it.

Believe in the power of goodness which we all have.
Be an oasis for people who are suffering from spiritual thirst.
Have a vision of a society that has ridden itself of social injustices.

This time, we are challenged to make a mass enlightenment.
It’s not any different from other challenges we have had to take care of.
We always did take care of them, and came out of it.

The Human Race is a miracle race.
We can do anything we want.
Just focus on what to do, and how simple it is.

Look into people’s eyes.
They are your eyes.
They are beautiful.
They are smiling.

Let’s go!

I love you!

Yoko Ono
Hiroshima Day
6 August 2014

PS – Thank you for sending me the most beautiful spiritual bell. I shall ring this on the day, in memory of Hiroshima. In Sisterhood and love, yoko


“No More Hiroshima”

Yoko participates in a Hiroshima peace event

Yoko visited Hiroshima to participate in a peace event held on July 30 at the International Conference Center Hiroshima, whose attendees included an atomic bomb survivor and some three hundred students. With next year being the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings, the event was held as a show of resolve to the world that we must not allow this unprecedented tragedy to ever happen again.

“I am delighted for the opportunity to talk about peace with you,” Yoko said in her opening remarks. “Let us continue to raise awareness of how much suffering the atomic bombs caused, and how vital peace is.” The participants then took part in an “orizuru event,” an event proposed by Yoko in which they folded origami cranes – considered a symbol of peace in Japan – as they prayed for the tragedies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki to never be repeated. They then exchanged conversation with Yoko about the importance of peace.

Next up were members of the local high school calligraphy club, who, as John Lennon’s “Love” played in the background, painted the words “Kibou No Michi” (“Road of Hope”) on a 5 x 5 meter square sheet of paper in an impressive calligraphy performance. Yoko added her own calligraphy beneath these words, as she wrote: “Let us nurture the dream of peace together” using a large brush. This calligraphy work will be donated to the people of Fukushima, who continue to suffer from the effects of the nuclear power plant disaster caused by the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck the region three years ago.

“Yoko’s story about the origami cranes was very memorable,” said a high school junior student who took part in the event. “I think it’s important for people from my generation to learn about war and peace, so that we can pass this on.”

Yoko, meanwhile, gave the following comment: “I felt the spirits of people who passed away the day the atomic bomb was dropped to this beautiful city, and how the whole city recovered by the effort of the Hiroshima people now. The spirits seemed very proud of what the people have done and wanted to present that and share that with me. The Hiroshima City now, is all green and shining under a blue sky with great summer clouds Japan is famous for.”


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