from Asahi.com

The prize-giving ceremony for the 8th Hiroshima Art Prize (sponsored by Hiroshima City and Asahi Newspapers), an award for contemporary artists whose work has contributed to peace, was held at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Hiroshima on July 29th. The avant-garde artist (78), wife of the late John Lennon, a former Beatle, was there to accept the prize. Saying that “the whole world recognises how Hiroshima picked itself up and rebuilt itself so remarkably after being totally annihilated,” she spoke of her determination to evoke that power her future artistic work.

In the morning of the same day she visited the Hiroshima Peace Park, and laid a wreath at the Memorial Cenotaph for the victims of the atomic bombing. She also toured the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum (the atomic bomb archive), and appealed to people to “make sure to look (at the exhibits) and don’t try to avoid them. If you haven’t been there yet, please do visit, and look carefully at them all.”

To commemorate the award, the museum will host her exhibition “ROAD OF HOPE –YOKO ONO 2011 until October 16th. The exhibition features works inspired by the recent disaster at Fukushima, as well as the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and embodies a spirit of hope for the future.



オノ・ヨーコさん原爆慰霊碑に献花 ヒロシマ賞受賞

現代美術を通じて平和に貢献した作家に贈られる第8回ヒロシマ賞(広島市、朝日新聞社など主催)の授賞式が29日、広島市南区の市現代美術館であった。元ビートルズの故ジョン・レノンさんの妻で前衛芸術家のオノ・ヨーコさん(78)が受賞者として出席。「広島が全部無くしたところから立ち上がり、ここまですばらしく再建できたのは全世界に認められている」としたうえで、その力を受け継ぎ、今後の創作活動に生かす決意を語った。

この日午前には広島市中区の平和記念公園を訪れ、原爆死没者慰霊碑に献花。広島平和記念資料館(原爆資料館)も見学し、「(展示物を)避けずに、はっきり見る必要がある。まだ見ていないのなら、ぜひ来て、一つ一つ丹念に見てほしい」と広く呼びかけた。

受賞記念として、30日~10月16日、同美術館で「オノ・ヨーコ展 希望の路(みち) YOKO ONO 2011」が開かれる。同展では、広島と長崎に加え、東日本大震災の犠牲者の鎮魂と、未来への希望を託した作品を展示する。

関連リンク





from The Japan Times, Saturday, July 30, 2011.

HIROSHIMA —

Yoko Ono, the New York-based avant-garde artist and widow of former Beatle John Lennon, visited the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum on Friday morning.

Ono, 78, was in Hiroshima to attend an award ceremony and receive the eighth Hiroshima Art Prize for her contribution to world peace through contemporary art. The ceremony was to be held Friday night at the Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art.

In addition to her wide-ranging artistic activities, Ono is known as an active supporter of the peace movement. She spoke in support of the abolishment of nuclear weapons at the review conferences of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty at the United Nations in 2005 and 2010.

The triennial prize, established in 1989, has been awarded to other artists, including fashion designer Issey Miyake and Chinese artist Cai Guoqiang.




Yoko Ono calls on people to show power of Hiroshima to the world

from The Mainichi Daily News

HIROSHIMA (Kyodo) — Yoko Ono, a New York-based artist and the widow of former Beatle John Lennon, called on people to promote the power of Hiroshima — a city rebuilt from ashes after being devastated by a U.S. atomic bomb in 1945 — while in the city on Friday to receive the Hiroshima Art Prize.

“Let’s show the people of the world the power of Hiroshima, which has risen from the point where it lost everything,” Ono said at the awards ceremony held at the Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art.

Yoko Ono receives the 8th Hiroshima Art Prize for her contributions to world peace through contemporary art. Photo: Kyodo

Ono, 78, received the eighth Hiroshima Art Prize for her contributions to world peace through contemporary art. The triennial prize, established in 1989, has been given to other artists, including Japanese fashion designer Issey Miyake and Chinese artist Cai Guoqiang.

Prior to the ceremony, Ono visited the Peace Memorial Museum located in the western Japanese city’s Peace Memorial Park and said, “I want the people of the world to know what kind of suffering Hiroshima has endured until now. We have the responsibility to see the calamity of atomic bombing.”

Ono also touched upon the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, saying, she is “mortified” to see Japan become the only country that has twice suffered massive damage caused by radiation, referring to this year’s nuclear power plant disaster and the atomic bombings during World War II.

Ono, guided by the museum head Koichiro Maeda, toured the facility taking a look at displays of photos of radiation victims and exhibits including a stone imprinted with a shadow of a person exposed to the heat wave from the atomic bombing. She sometimes gasped in astonishment saying, “It’s awful.”

Before her visit to the museum, she offered flowers at the cenotaph for the atomic-bomb victims, also located in the park, and prayed for the victims.

Ono is a well known for being a peace activist in addition to her wide-ranging artistic activities, including painting and performances.

She has won a prize for her work and made speeches in support of the abolition of nuclear weapons when she attended the review conferences of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty at the United Nations in 2005 and 2010.

(Mainichi Japan) July 30, 2011





Yoko Ono Prays at the Hiroshima Memorial Cenotaph

from Yomiuri Shimbun

The New York-based artist Yoko Ono (78), widow of the former Beatle John Lennon and who has called for peace all around the world, yesterday visited the Hiroshima Peace Park and prayed for the victims of the atomic bombing.

She is in Japan to stage an exhibition and receive the Hiroshima Art Prize which is awarded by the city to artists who have contributed to peace in the field of contemporary art. On the same day she laid a wreath for the victims of the atomic bombing on the Memorial Cenotaph, and toured the Peace Memorial Museum. She left a message of peace in the visitors’ book encouraging everyone to have a dream, and urged any Japanese who have not yet seen the museum to come and see for themselves the full horror of the bombing.

She referred to the recovery efforts being made in Fukushima, saying “Let’s take the road of hope and not give up. The world believes that the Japanese can do it.”



Yoko Ono lays a wreath at Memorial Cenotaph

from Mainichi Shimbun

International artist Yoko Ono, who is currently in Hiroshima, laid a wreath yesterday at the Memorial Cenotaph in the Hiroshima Peace Park. At a press conference Ms Ono said it doesn’t matter whether or not you have money or are famous, if everyone does what they can, however small, we can achieve world peace.

Ms Ono is here in Hiroshima to accept the Hiroshima Art Prize awarded to artists who have contributed to world peace. After visiting the Memorial Cenotaph, she toured the Memorial Peace Museum with the director.

The award ceremony was held at the Museum of Contemporary Art and Yoko Ono’s exhibition “Road of Hope” opens there from today. The works evoke the painful emotions behind the tragedies of Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Fukushima, and express a desire to encourage people. She said “Having built itself up step-by-step from a burnt-out wasteland after the war, Japan can rebuild itself again. The world is watching Japan with respect.”


Yoko Ono Visits the Peace Memorial Museum

from Sankei Shimbun

The New York-based artist Yoko (78), widow of the former Beatle John Lennon, yesterday visited the Peace Park in Hiroshima, and laid a wreath at the Cenotaph. Ms Ono referred to the recent disaster in Fukushima, saying “The Japanese are a people of wisdom, courage and patience. The world expects great things of us.”

Ms Ono performed a well-received concert for peace at Miyajima in 1995 on the 50th anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb, and was chosen to receive the 8th Hiroshima Art Prize awarded to artists who have contributed to peace in the field of contemporary art.

After laying a wreath, Ms Ono visited the Peace Memorial Museum, and left a message for peace in the visitor’s book. She also encouraged all Japanese people to come to the museum at least once to learn about what happened in the past.



Yoko Ono visits Hiroshima

from Chugoku Shimbun

The eighth Hiroshima Art Prize (sponsored by Hiroshima City), awarded to contemporary artists who contribute to peace, was given yesterday to international artist and peace activist Yoko Ono (78). The award ceremony and a reception were held at the Museum of Contemporary Art, from where Ms Ono sent out messages of peace.

Accepting the prize from Kazumi Matsui, Mayor of Hiroshima, Ms Ono explained that the disaster at Fukushima had happened after she had been told that she was to be awarded the prize, and she had felt that she was being called to Hiroshima. Her exhibition which opens today at the Museum of Contemporary Art features works which evoke the spirits of those who died in the disasters at Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Fukushima, and embodies a message of hope.

Before the award ceremony, she visited the Peace Memorial Park, and toured the Peace Memorial Museum. She said that she thought everybody had a duty to be aware of the horror of atomic weapons. Linking the atomic bombings with the nuclear accident at Fukushima, she said that it was very distressing to think that Japan was the only country in which nuclear disasters had occurred twice. At a press conference she said that world peace could be achieved if everybody were to play their part, however small.

Ms Ono continues to carry out a wide range of artistic activities from her base in New York. She was awarded the prize because of her consistent commitment to peace through the messages sent out with her husband, the late John Lennon. The Hiroshima Art Prize is awarded once every three years.



Yoko Ono visits Hiroshima

from Nihon Keizai Shimbun

The artist Yoko Ono (78), widow of former Beatle John Lennon, yesterday accepted the Hiroshima Art Prize awarded to artists who have made a contribution to peace through contemporary art.

At the prize-giving ceremony held at the Hiroshima Museum of Contemporary Art Ms Ono said she wanted to show the world the strength Hiroshima had shown in rebuilding itself after such complete annihilation. Ms Ono’s exhibition opens at the Museum from today.

Prior to the ceremony she laid a wreath at the Memorial Cenotaph and visited the Peace Memorial Museum. Saying that she wanted everyone in the world to understand what Hiroshima had been through, and linking this to the nuclear accident in Fukushima, she said how painful it was to know that Japan was the only country that had twice had to suffer the effects of atomic radiation.


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2 Responses to Yoko Ono lays flowers at Hiroshima Memorial Cenotaph, receives Hiroshima Art Prize

  1. Jorge says:

    I’m touched by all those beautiful plants whose blooming were dramatically cut one day, but that flower in our hearts every night.

  2. BIA says:

    Congratulations for everything Yoko! I remembered Lennon, he always gave you many flowers, was so beautiful and romantic.

    Peace and Light in your heart! :)

    i ii iii

    BIA

    PORTO ALEGRE – BRASIL

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