Cover image courtesy of James White, design by Edward Harrison

Twitter brings world closer for Japan quake charity e-book

By Hugh Lawson, Reuters

May 10 (Reuters Life!) – An avid Twitter user’s desire to help Japan recover from the devastating March earthquake and tsunami has resulted in a charity e-book based on material gathered from around the world — all within three days.

With Yoko Ono and cult sci-fi author William Gibson among the contributors, the e-book “2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake” was available for download within a month and raised $25,000 for the Japan Red Cross in its first two weeks.

Now a print version is in the works, along with planned translations into Japanese, Dutch, and German as well as a bilingual Japanese-English version.

None of it would have happened without Twitter, said “Our Man in Abiko,” who prefers to go only by his Twitter name to keep the focus on charity raising.

“I just looked at it as a two-fold thing: one, let’s make some money to help people, and two, let’s record this event. And this was the only way I knew how,” the 40-year-old British man, who has lived in Japan for four years, said.

The inspiration came to him about a week after the March 11 disaster as he was taking a shower at his apartment in Abiko, a Tokyo satellite city, wondering what he could do to help.

He sent out a tweet asking people for their impressions, stories, pictures or art — anything at all inspired by the quake, from Japan or overseas. Whatever he got within 48 hours would form the basis for a book.

Target time to first draft: a few days.

Within an hour, two pieces had come in, a story and a photo. Within a day, 70 entries had piled up and the project had gained momentum while keeping its sense of urgency.

“Many people saying what’s the deadline. Do people ask quake survivors when they’d like to be rescued? The answer is now baby, NOW,” Our Man In Abiko tweeted soon after his initial shout-out for contributions.

ASK TWITTER FOR HELP

Over three days, ultimately, he had 89 contributions from a range of people including some in the disaster zone, journalists covering the story, relatives of those hit by the disaster, and former foreign residents of Japan.

He tweeted for help with the editing and got responses from three people: a follower of his tweets in northern California, a foreign resident of Tokyo who had flown to Los Angeles as panic set in over the nuclear crisis after the disaster, and someone in New York whom he still only knows by their Twitter name.

“Whenever I had a problem or needed help, I just asked Twitter,” he said.

Eventually, more than 200 writers, editors, designers and translators from all over the world got involved, showing how keen people were to help.

Amazon and the Sony Reader Store waived their usual fees and costs, helping the book rapidly rack up the fundraising contributions.

“It’s therapeutic for the writers to put their feelings down — and it’s therapeutic for those buying the book because they’re doing something to help,” he said.

But getting the book into print was seen as key to keep the fundraising going. Here, too, Twitter helped clear the way.

Lower-management Amazon staff contacted by one of those following the project at first kept their distance on the grounds that the company wouldn’t want to be accused of cashing in on a disaster by charging its usual publishing costs.

But then one contributor with connections at the company headquarters in Seattle stepped in, while Our Man sent tweets to Amazon.co.jp’s top representative, who had a Twitter account of his own.

Eventually their efforts paid off, and the company has agreed to sell the book as a print-on-demand issue with no costs involved, due out soon.

Our Man in Abiko said the response to his call, which surprised him, showed the potential of Twitter to bring the world together when needed.

“I have no big connections and yet I’ve been able to pull this all together. If I can do it, there’s no reason why a lot of other people with a similar mindset couldn’t do it too,” he said.

http://www.quakebook.org



Twitter Sourced #Quakebook created in 1 week for Japanese earthquake & tsunami relief

Tokyo, Japan — In just over a week, a group of professional and citizen journalists have collaborated via Twitter to create a book to raise money for Japanese Red Cross earthquake and tsunami relief efforts.

 

The book will be available for download via Amazon’s Kindle and Sony’s Reader ebook platforms within several days.

One hundred percent of revenues will go to the Japanese Red Cross Society.

Sign up here to be notified when the book is available.

#Quakebook.org - A Twitter-sourced charity book about how the Japanese Earthquake at 2:46 on March 11 2011 affected us all. Raising money for the Japan Red Cross.

http://www.quakebook.org



2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake

The 98-page book, titled 2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake and known on Twitter as “#quakebook”, is the brainchild of a Briton who lives in the Tokyo area and blogs under the pseudonym “Our Man in Abiko”.

The day after the earthquake and tsunami, Our Man in Abiko wrote on his blog, ”Is there anything you can do? Right now, I’m not sure. But I’ll think of something.”

A few days later, he did think of something. The former journalist put out a call on his blog and via Twitter for art, essays and photographs that reflected first-person accounts of the disaster. He decided he would edit them into a book and donate all the revenues to the Japanese Red Cross Society. Within 15 hours, he had received 74 eyewitness submissions from all over Japan, as well as reactions from elsewhere in Asia, Europe and North America.

In addition to narratives by journalists and people who braved the disaster, 2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake contains writing created specifically for the book by authors William Gibson and Barry Eisler, as well as a piece by artist and musician Yoko Ono.

“The primary goal,” Our Man in Abiko says, “is to raise awareness, and in doing so raise money for the Japanese Red Cross Society to help the thousands of homeless, hungry and cold survivors of the earthquake and tsunami. The biggest frustration for many of us was being unable to help these victims. I don’t have any medical skills, and I’m not a helicopter pilot, but I can edit. I’m doing what I can do.” With the book completed, the project team turned again to social media. In one day, they created a website , Facebook page and Twitter account (@quakebook). The project quickly got attention from Twitter users like Yoko Ono as well as tech, publishing, and Japan-centric blogs.

“Twitter has been an amazing collaboration tool,” says Our Man in Abiko. “A few tweets pulled together nearly everything – all the participants, all the expertise – and in just over a week we had created a book including stories from an 80-year-old grandfather in Sendai, a couple in Canada waiting to hear if their relatives were okay, and a Japanese family who left their home, telling their young son they might never be able to return. Soon we were working with the world’s biggest ebook distributors and fielding calls from newspapers and television stations on five continents. People around the world are responding to the message of #quakebook [and] I really feel we are on the brink of something amazing.”

ChrisMacKenzie: Copter lift

Daniel Freytag: Epicenter

Kiyomu Tomita: Names

Yuki Nakanishi: Lotus

 









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6 Responses to Twitter brings world closer for Japan quake charity e-book #quakebook

  1. This is incredible. I will get a copy of his book when it comes out. I am glad I am aware of this and that is thanks to twitter.

  2. ShootTokyo says:

    This is such a moving effort. I hope everyone buys a copy when it comes out.

  3. Carrrrrlos says:

    Thank you for posting this – it is great to see the creative community supporting those in need.

  4. BIA says:

    Hi Yoko!
    Despite the sadness at what happened in JAPAN, there are good people with good intentions to help, God bless you all. That soon may see JAPAN recovered. Peace and Love Forever!!! Kisses

    BIA

    PORTO ALEGRE – BRASIL

  5. I am trilled that I was able to go to the concert in NYC, the incredible music was a true gift, specially when “Aguas de marco” by Tom Jobin who is from my home country was plaid. It was so touching, and at the same time I was able to contribute to a country who I love so much. Thanks Mrs Yoko.

  6. Dave says:

    A great cause that everyone should get behind.

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