////Group Show: Ni Una Mas (Not One More) [Philadephia, PA, USA]

Group Show: Ni Una Mas (Not One More) [Philadephia, PA, USA]

Flowers mark the deaths of women in Juarez Mexico

Ni Una Mas exhibit opens at Pearlstein

by Omkar Baxi, The Triangle.org [Photos: Sarah Michelson]

The Ni Una Mas: Not One More art show hosted by Drexel’s Pearlstein Gallery was officially opened following a performance art piece and public rally ARTMARCH May 15.

Drexel students and members of the Greater Philadelphia community gathered at the Armory and marched through Market Street to the Ni Una Mas show held at 3401 Filbert Street in order to protest the Juarez femicide and murders.

The ARTMARCH aimed to send a political message as well as capture the distress of the women of Juarez by representing the victims of the Juarez murders. Women taking part in the march were given a pink Ni Una Mas t-shirt meant to replicate the iconic pink dress that has been used to represent the Juarez victims while men were given black t-shirts and spread through the crowd.

According to Zeek Weil, director of communications and events at the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts and Design, over 600 t-shirts were distributed to people that took part in the ARTMARCH. Participants called for the end of the Juarez murders, shouting “ni una mas/not one more” and “save the girls, not one more,” and also represented the Juarez victims by calling out their names during the march.

“You are not only making art history here today, but also political history,” Abbie Dean, a Drexel trustee and co-curator of Ni Una Mas, told the ARTMARCH participants.

Notable speakers such as Larry Cox, executive director of Amnesty International USA, Diana Washington-Valdez, the reporter who originally brought the Juarez murders to light, and Marisela Ortiz, founder of Mothers of Juarez, a community group, commended the ARTMARCH participants for showing their support for the Juarez victims.

Top Flowers mark the deaths of women in Juarez Mexico. Bottom Artists and students work to prepare the Ni Una Mas exhibit for its opening in the Pearlstien Gallery at Drexel University.

Artists and students work to prepare the Ni Una Mas exhibit for its opening in the Pearlstien Gallery at Drexel University.

“Many of the young women here today meet the exact profile of the victims in Juarez. [They] would be in danger in Juarez. Thank you for showing your solidarity,” Valdez said.

“It is very emotional to know we are not alone. Thank you for being here because you are giving a voice to these crimes,” Ortiz said.

“I attended [the ARTMARCH] because I had heard about the femicide in Juarez a year ago, and I feel strongly about the atrocities that are occurring there. As I can’t do anything directly to help right now, I wanted to show that it wasn’t something I was willing to just forget about,” Maliha Ahmed, a junior in biology, said.

According to Cox, an art show in support of the Juarez murders can be very effective as a political tool because art can effectively show the violence and atrocities that can be hard to capture with words. Art can also force people to look within themselves and do something.

Joseph Gregory, head of the Department of Art and Art History at Drexel, compared the possibility of changing the situation in Juarez with the possibility of having a black president 40 years ago. According to Gregory, the election of Barack Obama happened because people called for change and social justice. Gregory stated that the same forces could change the situation in Juarez.

“You may not be able to weigh that change tomorrow morning, but it will come and you will have been part of it,” Gregory said as he addressed the ARTMARCH participants.

According to Mark Greenberg, Drexel provost, the Ni Una Mas show and the ARTMARCH reflect one of Drexel’s philosophies of speaking out for those that cannot voice their own opinions.

Madison Thompson and Spencer Roberts, freshmen in environmental engineering and environmental science, respectively, thought that the exhibition of Ni Una Mas at Drexel was successful because it increased awareness on campus and made positive action in Juarez more likely.

The exhibit and ARTMARCH also showed that Drexel’s art department is politically involved, which is an important message for University students, according to Ahmed.

According to Cox, the best outcome of the events was to show solidarity with the Juarez victims. Cox stated that the Mexican government has said the right things about Juarez but never done anything, evidently hoping that the issue will be forgotten. To Cox, the ARTMARCH and Ni Una Mas show that the victims are not being forgotten and that action must be taken. Cox encouraged students to act on the issue by joining Amnesty International and by lobbying the United States and Mexican governments.

The ARTMARCH culminated with the official opening of the Ni Una Mas show at the new Pearlstein Gallery at 3401 Filbert Street. The show includes artwork from the siblings and children of Juarez victims, local artists, as well as well-recognized artists such as Yoko Ono, and will be on display until July 16.

Artwork by Yoko Ono to Be Installed for Exhibition on Juarez Murders

A 15 x20’ interactive canvas, “heal” by Yoko Ono will be installed at Drexel’s new Leonard Pearlstein Gallery as part of Ni Una Mas—The Juarez Murders (Not One More) exhibition.

heal

by Yoko Ono

Our body is the scar of our mind

We are the oasis of our planet

We can move mountains

Heal planet

Heal earth

Heal us



The piece includes a large slashed canvas. Visitors are invited to sew the canvas back together as a symbol of healing.

Ono’s piece is one of more than 70 works by 20 international artists including Kiki Smith, Nancy Spero, Irish activist painter Brian Maguire and local Philadelphia artists Arlene Love and Jen Blazina.

Ni Una Mas (“Not One More”)
May 16 – July 16, 10am – 1 pm

Leonard Pearlstein Gallery
3401 Filbert Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 [map]
(between N. 34th and 36th Streets)

Ni Una Mas

UPDATE: IN THE FIRST 3 MONTHS OF 2010, 34 WOMEN HAVE BEEN REPORTED MISSING, ACCORDING TO A REPORT FROM THE STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICE FOR THE NORTHERN ZONE IN JUAREZ.

Major Art Exhibition, ARTMARCH, Film Screenings, Concerts and Lectures Will Bring Attention to the murders of over 700 Women in Juarez, Mexico

Ni Una Mas is a powerful Drexel University-wide collaboration of academic, student and institutional departments intended to raise awareness about gender violence and, in particular, crimes against women in the Mexican bordertown of Juarez. The cornerstone of Ni Una Mas is an art exhibition featuring over 70 works of art by twenty international artists, including Yoko Ono, Kiki Smith, Nancy Spero, Irish activist painter Brian Maguire and local artists Arlene Love and Jen Blazina. Work of noted forensic artist and Philadelphia native Frank Bender will also be included in the exhibition. Ni Una Mas will demonstrate to students and the Philadelphia region that art can be a force for social change.

ArtMarch

Ni Una Mas will kick off with ARTMARCH on the afternoon of Saturday, May 15. ARTMARCH is a mass demonstration/performance art piece that will include over 700 young women from Drexel University dressed in the iconic pink color of the victims’ memorial crosses in Juarez. The rally and ARTMARCH will start at the 33rd St Armory and wind through the streets and finish at the Leonard Pearlstein Gallery at 3401 Filbert.

Click here to register and receive more information for ARTMARCH.

Organized by Drexel University and Amnesty International, ARTMARCH will provide a forum to speak out against these awful crimes which have been going on for over 17 years for which no individuals have been tried or brought to justice.

The exhibition will run May 15th — July 16th at the site of the new Leonard Pearlstein Gallery (3401 Filbert St.). An opening reception and tour of the exhibition will take place at the gallery following ARTMARCH from 5-7 PM, Saturday, May 15th.

During Ni Una Mas there will be a variety of free events to raise awareness including film screenings, lectures, concert performances and more.

Juarez Opening Screening Juarez Intercultural

Additional Ni Una Mas events are in the planning stage and will include the participation of sponsoring Drexel partners from the College of Arts & Sciences, the Goodwin School of Professional Studies, the Earle Mack School of Law, the Pennoni Honors College, the Intercultural Engagement & Diversity Initiative, the Office of Multicultural Programs, the Office of Student Life, Intercultural Journeys and the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design.

Directions

The new Leonard Pearlstein Gallery is located at 3401 Filbert St. and is easily accessible by driving or mass transit.

Driving: Turn north onto at 36th Street from Market St. Travel to the first intersection and turn right onto Filbert Street. The gallery is on the left past the parking lot on the corner. Metered street parking is available on many of the streets surrounding the gallery, please read all signs posted by the Philadelphia Parking Authority detailing payment requirements. You may also park in Drexel’s K parking lot located adjacent to the gallery. To park in the lot continue east on Filbert Street and make a 180 degree turn onto Warren Street. This turn occurs prior to reaching 34th Street. Travel west on Warren Street to the lot entrance, located on your left prior to reaching 36th Street.

Mass Transit: Septa’s Blue subway line stops at 34th Street and all green subway-surface lines stop at 33rd or 36th Streets. Upon exiting the subway station you arrive at, walk to the gallery at 3401 Filbert St.

Facebook Twitter

Curator’s Statement

Ni Una Mas…

Since 1993, more than 600 young women and girls have been the victims of an ongoing terror in the city and surrounding area of Juarez, Mexico, an area just across the river/border from El Paso, Texas The majority are Mexican, but a number are American citizens. Nearly all are young students and factory girls–maquiladoras between the ages of 14 and 22. Some are missing without a trace, but hundreds have been discovered dead in multiple sites in the nearby desert. From their remains it is certain they have been battered, sexually abused, and often grotesquely mutilated; some have had their organs removed. Various theories abound, but the greatest mystery beyond who is responsible, is how the Mexican government and our own have allowed the femicide to continue. Very little has been done by the local Juarez police, the State of Chihuahua or the National Government to find the killers or to prevent new murders. The FBI, the UN and Amnesty International have attempted to investigate, but their offers are rebuffed and the crimes remain unsolved. In the years since the abductions began, the families, in particular, the mothers of these girls, a few dedicated journalists, musicians, filmmakers and artists have kept the chronicle alive as the horrific deaths continue.

How artists respond in the face of these atrocities is the core of this exhibit Ni Una Mas: The Juarez Murders. Twenty notable artists—men, women, Latino and American bear witness to the many faces and facets of this tragedy. Their responses are personal and varied as they confronted the implicit sexism, drug politics, corruption and indifference behind the story as well as the sadness and outrage at the continued demeaning and devaluation of women. They remind us that this crisis demands action since every day another girl is at risk of suffering vicious abuse and certain death. We owe a debt to Frontera 450 + presented by the Station Museum in Houston in 2006. Four years later and 150 more girls missing, we are impelled to try anew.

The Curators of the Leonard Pearlstein Gallery

Curator’s Statement

Responding to the unfolding mayhem along the U.S.-Mexican border, NI UNA MAS: The Juarez Murders, is an art exhibition unabashedly activist in intent. It is not the first instance of public outcry for political action to be taken against the genocide transpiring there. The ever-mounting number and heinous character of the atrocities committed against young women in Juarez, Mexico have compelled widespread media attention for more than a decade: since 1993, more than 700 girls have been abducted, raped, and murdered there without penalty. From what we know of the circumstances of their deaths, it is apparent that they are being abused and killed for the sheer pleasure of the violence. It is open season on women in Juarez because there is no one in authority to give the murderers pause or to protect the innocent; for in Juarez, the faces of the perpetrators and protectors are blurred into one, and this political paralysis has made it a land of murder without debt.

NI UNA MAS (Not One More), seeks to inspire viewers to action in the face of this on- going calamity, to demand that concrete measures be undertaken to protect the women. To this end, the exhibition has gathered the voices of gifted artists who have been deeply moved by the femicides of Juarez. Each adds a unique voice to the chorus of lamentation; different aspects of the tragedy are addressed in different ways by different artists. But there are also common tones and themes that rise to the surface from this diversity, giving the exhibition the cohesive power of a single outcry.

A central piece of the exhibition that will set its tone and capture the imagination of the world through its immediate electronic dispersal, is ARTMARCH for Juarez, a mass demonstration/performance art piece that will open the exhibition on the afternoon of May 15, 2010 in Philadelphia. Hundreds of participants, including 700 young women from Drexel University dressed in the iconic pink color of the victims’ memorial crosses in Juarez, will move through the streets of Philadelphia, finally arriving at the 33rd street Armory building on Drexel’s campus for a political rally featuring concerned political figures and celebrities. NI UNA MAS intends to set a new standard for the effective convergence of aesthetic experience and political activism.

CURATORS:

Abbie Dean | Dr. Joseph Gregory | Orlando Pelliccia

The Exhibition

The exhibition will open on Philadelphia’s Drexel University campus on the afternoon of May 15 with ARTMARCH for Juarez, a massive demonstration/performance art piece that will involve both hundreds of student participants and members of the community. NI UNA MAS (Not One More): The Juarez Murders opening at the new Leonard Pearlstein Gallery at Drexel University May 15, 2010 (3401 Filbert St.).

Artists

The exhibition features work by the following artists: Frank Bender | Jen Blazina | Alice Leora Briggs | Margarita Cabrera | Coco Fusco | Maya Goded | Lise Bjorne Linnert | Arlene Love | Brian Maguire | Andrea Marshall | Luis Javier Martinez | Claudia de Monte | Carmen Montoya | Celia Alvarez Munoz | Yoko Ono | Susan Plum | Tim Rollins and KOS | Teresa Serrano | Kiki Smith | Nancy Spero | Arne Svenson

Events

Opening Reception
Saturday, May 15, 2010 from 5 – 7pm

The reception and exhibition are at Drexel’s newly acquired site for the Westphal College of Media Arts and Design, 3401 Filbert Street, part of the URBN Center at 3501 Market Street, Philadelphia

Film screening
Tuesday, May 18, 2010 at 7pm | Bossone Center

Pray the Devil Back to Hell is the riveting, true story of the unsung heroines of Liberia, who, armed only with white t-shirts and courage, brought down a dictator and ended a long, brutal war. Producer Abigail Disney will be present for a question and answer session following the screening.

Concert
Tuesday, May 25, 2010 at 7pm | Pearlstein Gallery

A concert performed by Intercultural Journeys, a musical ensemble comprised of Udi Bar David of the Philadelphia Orchestra and other noted musicians who bridge cultural divides through music. Bar David says of his belief that music can change the world, “While we may feel the challenges are too great, we must find a way. We owe it to ourselves and to our children.” As Margaret Meade said: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world . . . . indeed it is the only thing that ever has!”

Film screening
Tuesday, May 11, 2010 at 7pm | Bossone Center

A film screening of Mexican director Carlos Carrera’s film Backyard (“El Traspatio”) that stars Jimmy Smits and tells a harrowing story about the disturbing deaths and disappearances of young women in Juarez. The story follows police officer Blanca Bravo (Ana de la Reguera) who arrives from Mexico City to investigate these crimes, many of which occur to women working in multi-national factories or maquiladoras. Blanca discovers a complicit police force, an indifferent local population and chilling entrepreneurs like Mickey Santos (Smits). Through his film, Carrera denounces these culprits and illuminates the most devastating truth that these murders continue to happen and have unfortunately become commonplace.

ARTMARCH

GET INVOLVED! JOIN ARTMARCH FOR JUAREZ. ADD YOUR VOICE AND PRESENCE TO THIS POWERFUL RALLY AGAINST THE MURDERS AND ABDUCTIONS OF YOUNG WOMEN IN JUAREZ MEXICO. ACT NOW!

Sign up here

Related Links and Background


Joaquin Phoenix :30 second PSA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0Nvvlf0Ljw


MusicVideo: They all look like me…Ni Una Mas T-Shirt
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWJjPDe2pWk&NR=1


UNSETTLED DUST
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77ohsjTLhYI


2:38
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbFixUgJkVA

Jennifer Lopez works with Amnesty International and the Mothers of Juarez, article.
http://www.amnestyusa.org/artists-for-amnesty/bordertown/jennifer-lopez-working-alongside-amnesty- international/page.do?id=1101537

Article on Philadelphian Frank Bender International Forensic Artist on his Juarez Experience
http://newspapertree.com/features/2645-skulls-and-faces-investigations-and-the-pursuit-of-justice-for- women-in-juarez

Amnesty International
www.amnestyusa.org

Witness
http://www.witness.org

More Links

Watch our 30sec PSA airing nation-wide on Telemundo

Sponsoring Partner for ARTMARCH

Catalogue

Electronic Press Kit

Congress Resolution 90

Diana Washington Valdez Interview

Juarez Interviews

The Women of Juarez Through the Eyes of an Artist

El Paso Art Museum

Unsettled Dust

Ciudad Juarez Murders

Dual Injustice

Lise Bjorne

UNIVERSITY SPONSORS

College of Arts & Sciences
Goodwin School of Professional Studies
Earle Mack School of Law
Pennoni Honors College
Office of Intercultural Engagement & Diversity Initiative
Office of Multicultural Programs
Student Life
Intercultural Journeys
Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design

The Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts and Design

Drexel University’s Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design offers 14 undergraduate and five graduate programs in media, design and the performing arts. The College empowers students by imparting the knowledge, skills and techniques needed to succeed in highly competitive creative fields. Programs are taught in small studio settings, featuring hands-on learning and a faculty of industry practitioners who emphasize the use of the latest technologies. Westphal College is home to the Mandell Theater, the Pearlstein Gallery, Drexel’s cable television (DUTV) and radio (WKDU-FM) stations, the Rudman Institute for Entertainment Industry Studies, MAD Dragon Records and Drexel’s Historic Costume Collection.

In January 2009, the Westphal College received the single, largest philanthropic gift ever recorded at Drexel, $25 million. The gift is being used for the development and expansion of the college, including purchase of a 130,000 sq ft. Robert Venturi-designed building on Market Street. The Venturi building is one of two that will serve as the new home for the design programs of the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design.

Drexel is the premier co-operative education school in the United States and is a top-ranked, comprehensive, national research university. Allen Sabinson is the dean of the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts and Design. For more information about the College, go to: www.drexel.edu/westphal

The Leonard Pearlstein Gallery

Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts and Design
Drexel University
33rd and Market Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215 895 2548

Directions

The new Leonard Pearlstein Gallery is located at 3401 Filbert St. and is easily accessible by driving or mass transit.

Driving: Turn north onto at 36th Street from Market St. Travel to the first intersection and turn right onto Filbert Street. The gallery is on the left past the parking lot on the corner. Metered street parking is available on many of the streets surrounding the gallery, please read all signs posted by the Philadelphia Parking Authority detailing payment requirements. You may also park in Drexel’s K parking lot located adjacent to the gallery. To park in the lot continue east on Filbert Street and make a 180 degree turn onto Warren Street. This turn occurs prior to reaching 34th Street. Travel west on Warren Street to the lot entrance, located on your left prior to reaching 36th Street.

Mass Transit: Septa’s Blue subway line stops at 34th Street and all green subway-surface lines stop at 33rd or 36th Streets. Upon exiting the subway station you arrive at, walk to the gallery at 3401 Filbert St.

Press Release

Electronic Press Kit

Download the Ni Una Mas Electronic Press Kit here.

Press Contact

Website

http://www.drexel.edu/juarez/


Facebook Comments

comments

2010-05-22T13:46:12+00:00 May 22nd, 2010|Events & Exhibitions|